New Statesman: City Metric | Mumbai’s slumdog recycling works surprisingly well – unless you’re one of its workers

Dharavi is a 550-acre slum, a maze of corrugated iron and open sewers at the heart of India’s financial capital, Mumbai.

It is one of the most densely populated places on earth with population of roughly one million people.

A casual observer would see nothing but poverty, misery and squalor but look closer and you’ll find that the slum is the unlikely home of a recycling industry with efficiency levels reportedly higher than the UK’s.

For those struggling to survive, there is value in almost anything and nothing goes to waste. Prince Charles once even said that the slum, made famous by the film Slumdog Millionaire, was a model for the world in terms of sustainability.

Over the decades, Bollywood has sold an image of Mumbai as the ‘City of Dreams’, and people from all corners of the subcontinent have travelled to the city in search of a better life. The large majority of them end up in slums, like Dharavi.

This huge rural to urban migration has catapulted Mumbai, once a small British trading port, into the global league of megacity, with an eyewatering population of 21m (Greater Manchester’s population is 2.8m).

The problems that come with such a population are immense. Simply delivering electricity, sanitary provisions and clean water to the population is a mammoth task. But there’s one problem that stands out everywhere in India – rubbish.

In India, the handling of waste is considered a huge social taboo.

Historically, the lowest ranks of the Hindu caste system have been left to deal with waste disposal and many will still consider a person low and dirty if they handle more than the bare minimum of waste. Consequently, waste is dumped everywhere — in the streets, in the sea or behind homes.

Mumbai is no stranger to the problem. Every day the city will produce a veritable mountain of over 10,000 metric tonnes of solid waste.

This will be collected in large part by an army of 120,000 rag-pickers – unofficial waste collectors – who will take anything reusable they find to Dharavi and its famed 13thcompound.

They will sell their waste by the kilo to the hundreds of small recycling plants, and a kilogram of plastic bottles might be worth 15p.

The waste will then be processed by thousands of workers employed by the scrap masters. Dozens of plastic variations will be skilfully sorted into piles. These piles will be melted down in huge vats before being broken up into tiny reusable pellets. Metals and E-Waste will be broken down and sold for scrap or reusable parts.

In this way, it’s estimated that 80 per cent of the Mumbai’s solid waste is recycled into usable materials. The UK’s recycling rate was almost half that, with just under 45 per cent of household waste recycled in 2015.

Politicians are well aware that the slum’s work is essential. Situated in the centre of Mumbai, Dharavi sprawls across some of the most desirable real-estate in Asia.

Small cuts and wounds quickly become infected as workers sift through medical waste and other biohazardous substances.

Rag-pickers and recyclers hail mainly from the lower rungs of India’s caste system and struggle to gain formal recognition from the authorities.

“Most of the waste pickers in Mumbai are either women or children and they live and work under the most distressing conditions,” says Vimlendu Jha, director of environmental NGO Swechha.

“[They’ll be] harassed by the police for not having a proof of identity. Their contribution is never acknowledged.

“There is no clear policy to protect their rights or provide better conditions. The government doesn’t even acknowledge they exist.”

http://www.citymetric.com/fabric/mumbai-s-slumdog-recycling-works-surprisingly-well-unless-you-re-one-its-workers-3096

Girl wipes her eyes atop Bhalswa Dump, Delhi

Photo: William Brown for AJE ••• Every day Delhi produces around 10,000 metric tonnes of solid waste – roughly the weight of the Eiffel Tower. Official estimates predict that in 5 years the waste produced by the city will almost double to 18,000 tonnes a day. Bhalswa landfill towers above its surroundings. At 50 metres high and 40 acres across, it is a flaming mountain of decomposing waste. Due to social stigma across India, rag pickers face terrible discrimination and communities are often blighted by alcoholism, literacy and drug abuse. Campaigners say many of the children working on the municipal sites in Delhi are orphans or separated and thus highly vulnerable to sexual abuse or being trafficked into sex slavery.

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Al Jazeera| Delhi’s dilemma: What to do with its tonnes of waste?

Mountains of waste are dumped in open spaces where children can often be seen picking through the sometimes toxic material.

With Delhi’s population more than doubling since 1990, the city’s waste management infrastructure has been stretched beyond its limit. Every day Delhi produces around 10,000 metric tonnes of solid waste – roughly the weight of the Eiffel Tower. Official estimates predict that in five years the waste produced by the city will almost double to 18,000 tonnes a day.

Recently, India’s Supreme Court, angered by the apparent inaction on the issue, delivered a damning criticism of the city’s municipalities, saying that if Delhi’s waste was not managed properly the city faced an impending disaster.

Dozens of children, some as young as five, work alongside adults or in small groups with other children in northwest Delhi’s Bhalswa – one of three landfill sites in the city.

Although child labour is outlawed in India, UNICEF estimates that there are about 10.2 million children currently working in the country.

“On paper, these landfills are meant to be ‘sanitary’ landfills. But in reality, no precautions are taken. There’s no scientific process or segregation process. Almost 90 percent of the budget of the [Delhi] municipalities is spent on transporting waste, rather than managing waste,” said Vimlendu Jha, the executive director of Swechha, a Delhi-based NGO campaigning for social action on environmental issues.

“These are faceless, nameless individuals.”

The New Delhi Municipal Council, which manages Delhi’s waste, declined to comment on child labour at the landfill sites.

See full article / photos here: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2016/11/delhi-dilema-tonnes-waste-161124095624368.html